How to expose your reading list using rss

Reading Time: 1 minute

TL;DR

This post is about how I manage blog posts reading list. It list tools that I use on daily basis to collect and share what I read.

My first try was twitter. I use it for collecting my blog post reading list by following software testers that blog about software development and testing topics. Here is my following list.

But very soon, twitter failed me. As they started pivoting their business model, very soon I received in my twitter feed a lot of noise (shares, likes, advertisement, flame discussions).

Then I turned to rss Google reader. RSS is old technology, and you can check if web site supports it by just adding /rss at the end of site url. No noise, no flame wars, just useful data. Notifications about new blog posts. But Google decided to shut down Reader (no advertisements rings a bell).

Rss reader market is not so big, and after short investigation, I found Newsblur . It has browser and mobile desktop and I use paid option (I think 27 us$ per year).

I have around twenty feeds that I am following (security, software development and software testing).

Another issue is how to share what I have red to support the author? I know, there is Twitter, Facebook. But my Facebook friends are mostly not connected with software development.

Here is how I share my reading list. Newsblur has it own share feature, one click away. It is called blurblogs. What I share, directly goes to my blurblogs page. That page also has rss feed. I expose it on this blog first page.

rss is old and very useful technology, give it a try.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

Safety nets

Reading Time: 2 minutes

TL;DR

In this post I will present two examples of safety nets created by software industry professionals.

Note the context, I stated software industry professionals, which includes anybody involved in software development.

In Circus, trapeze artists have safety net to catch them if they fell. In modern software development, safety net for developers are software testers. Not to save their life, but to catch as many bugs as possible. In order to resolve that issue, companies started to remove dedicated software testers. Software developers are responsible for all software testing.

This is wrong from two angles. First, software tester job is not to find bugs but to provide information about software to people that matters (doing that, they also find bugs). Second, software testing is a craft that has SOME connection points with software development (writing automated tests). And usually, software developers are very bad at testing. I do not mean they write bad software testing automation code, but they are very bad in performing experiments (James Bach: “Testing is not about creating test cases. It is for damn sure not about the number of test cases you create. Testing is about performing experiments.)

During the Brighton TestBash 2017 open session day, I listened conversation between Anne-Marie Charrett and Paul Holland about safety nets. She consulted in company that removed software testers. They wanted to “cut” developer’s safety net. And guess what, developers found another safety nets.

I also have one example. I created a document with installation instructions. In order to avoid copy/paste effect, all commands were put as screenshots. Guess what? Software tester created his intermediate text file with those commands, so they could be copy pasted. As that created another level of documentation, those .txt files become very soon out of sync with main document that had screenshots.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

vim, show me your colors!

Reading Time: 2 minutes

TL;DR

This post is about vim and how you can start using it in your daily work.

At one point in my testing path, I decided that I should start using vim. I opened Google, and start my search journey. I searched for:

“vim development platform”

What got my intention was search result:

spf13-vim – The Ultimate Vim Distribution

This is “spf13-vim is a distribution of vim plugins and resources for Vim, Gvim and MacVim. Which means that you need to install vim by yourself, and this distribution will add a set of useful vim plugins for development. Adding new plugin is also simplified (although, you need to know linux cat basics to do that).

For me, important one are related to ruby language. Here is one rspec file, opened in mvim:

Yes, you have coloured syntax. For me, this is very important, because with colours, I make less syntax errors!

Ok, you are set to go and you expenses so far are 0.

To get to know basic, run vimtutor (linux and mac os have it, for windows read this).

Here is set of vim cmd’s that I use on daily basics:

  • fire up vim: cd to your development folder and type:
    mvim &
  • enter command mode
  • :
  • start folder explorer vim plugin (note, tab will complete your commands, so you can type Expl, then hit tab, and vim will do autocomplete
  • :Explore
  • open file in new tab
  • select file with arrow keys, then press t
  • close file
  • :q!
  • go to file bottom
  • G
  • go to file top
  • gg
  • go to end of line
  • $
  • go to start of line (this is zero)
  • 0
  • delete line
  • dd
  • undo action
  • u
  • start edit mode (you know that you are in edit mode when you see this in the bottom of vim

  • i
  • exit edit mode (you need to do that in order to do all other commands listed here
  • esc
  • delete character on the right
  • x
  • copy paste action. Note, if you start typing after you hit p, copied item is cleared from the buffer.
  • v, then with arrow keys make a selection, y, go to position when you want to paste, p, text will be pasted on the right of cursor
  • search
  • /, what you search, enter, found text will be highlighted, with n you move to next found item.

 

That it is. This is small set of features what vim can do, but for me it is enough to be productive!

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather

What I learned on Testival #29 meetup

Reading Time: 2 minutes

TL;DR

This post is about my learning experience on latest Testival meetup.

We had two talks and one 5 minute talk. We started with traditional introduction of every participant. Repsly was again event sponsor.

#1 Zoran Majstorović, ButterflyMX: Ruby Test Suite @ButteflyMX presented Ruby test ecosystem that his company use on daily basis. Those libraries cover whole testing pyramid.  Their web application is developed in Rails framework and they use following ruby gems (libraries):

  • rspec – test runner, automated checks and Rails mocks
  • FactoryGirl – test data
  • capybara – UI automation framework.

Code is on github, and they use branching and pull requests for deploy strategy.  CI system is Semaphore and Code Climate is set of open source Ruby libraries for code analysis.

#2 Marko Filipin, Head brewer and co-founder at Nova runda brewery: A/B testing beer

Nova Runda is one of the first Croatian micro brewery, they are known for their Indiegogo campaign through which they raised money to brew their first commercial beer, APA.

The best beer is one that always taste the same. Striving to that path, they started A/B beer testing. They presented two beers in three cups, A,B,C. They wanted to get statistics how many participants guessed which cups hold same beer. Participants were forbidden to do any commenting while testing the beer (no influence on other participants).

9 of 23 participants noted the difference. The number needs to be 12 so they can claim that they produced same beer in two different batches.

This is known as difference test. Preference test is subjective test. It gives answer which beer is prefered by the tester.

Yes/no test is acceptance test. Is this beer good enough to sell it?

What is beer quality?

  • from batch to batch, beer must taste the same
  • must have attributes of beer type. If you cooked Pale Ale, it must not taste like Indian Pale Ale.
  • ratio of sugar(malts)/bitterness(hops)
  • any not wanted tastes?

Zeljko Filipin presented problems with Vim UX in his 5 minute talk.

As a regular user of Vim, I suggest you to try this ultimate Vim distro. and start with basic tutorial found in Zeljko’s blog post.

 

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailby feather